Eads Clinic New Hours Of Care

 

The Eads Clinic is changing office hours

Open through Lunch

 

MONDAY—FRIDAY

7:30AM—6:00PM

 

SATURDAYS

10AM—2PM

 

Medical Providers—

Dr David Lenderts, MD

Dr Megan Silva, MD

Dr Jeffrey Waggoner, MD

Dawn Back, PAC

 

 

 

 

August is National Psoriasis Awareness Month

August is Psoriasis Awareness Month

About Psoriasis

There are five types of psoriasis. The most common form, plaque psoriasis, appears as raised, red patches covered with a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells. Psoriasis can occur on any part of the body and is associated with other serious health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease and depression.

Symptoms and diagnosis

Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that causes raised, red, scaly patches to appear on the skin. It typically affects the outside of the elbows, knees or scalp, though it can appear on any location. Some people report that psoriasis is itchy, burns and stings.

If you develop a rash that doesn't go away with an over-the-counter medication, you should consider contacting your doctor.

Diagnosis

About 95 percent of the time, your health care provider can make a psoriasis diagnosis just by visual inspection. Your doctor will consider where the raised, red, scales appear, if they have well-defined edges and how the rash responds to medication when making a diagnosis.

Psoriasis may seem similar to eczema, but there are several differences:

  • Psoriasis plaques are well-defined; eczema tends to be flatter with less well-defined edges.

  • Eczema typically occurs on locations atypical for psoriasis, such as the front of elbows or behind the knees. Psoriasis is most often found on the outside of knees and elbows, the scalp, the lower back, the face, the palms and soles of feet. It also can show up in other places, such as fingernails, toenails, the genitals and inside the mouth.

    When biopsied, psoriasis skin looks thicker and inflamed when compared to skin with eczema.

    Your doctor also will want to learn about your family history. About one-third of people with psoriasis have a family member with the disease 

    Types of Psoriasis

    Psoriasis appears in a variety of forms with distinct characteristics. Typically, an individual has only one type of psoriasis at a time. Generally, one type of psoriasis will clear and another form of psoriasis will appear in response to a trigger.

    Plaque Psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris)

    Plaque psoriasis is the most common form of the disease and appears as raised, red patches covered with a silvery white buildup of dead skin cells or scale. These patches or plaques most often appear on the scalp, knees, elbows and lower back. They are often itchy and painful, and they can crack and bleed.

     Guttate

    Guttate [GUH-tate] psoriasis is a form of psoriasis that often starts in childhood or young adulthood. This is the second most common type of psoriasis, after plaque psoriasis. About 10 percent of people who get psoriasis develop guttate psoriasis.

    Inverse

    Inverse psoriasis (also known as intertriginous psoriasis) shows up as very red lesions in body folds. It may appear smooth and shiny. Many people have another type of psoriasis elsewhere on the body at the same time.

     Pustular

    Pustular [PUHS-choo-lar] psoriasis in characterized by white pustules (blisters of noninfectious pus) surrounded by red skin. The pus consists of white blood cells. It is not an infection, nor is it contagious.

     Erythrodermic

    Erythrodermic [eh-REETH-ro-der-mik] psoriasis is a particularly inflammatory form of psoriasis that often affects most of the body surface. It may occur in association with von Zumbusch pustular psoriasis. It is a rare type of psoriasis, occurring once or more during the lifetime of 3 percent of people who have psoriasis. It generally appears on people who have unstable plaque psoriasis. This means the lesions are not clearly defined. Widespread, fiery redness and exfoliation of the skin characterize this form. Severe itching and pain often accompanies it.

    NOTE: Individuals having an erythrodermic psoriasis flare should see a doctor immediately. This form of psoriasis can be life-threatening.

      Psoriasis Treatments

    Treating your psoriasis is critical to good disease management and overall health. Work with your doctor to find a treatment—or treatments—that reduce or eliminate your symptoms. What works for one person with psoriasis might not work for another. So it's important to know the different treatment options and keep trying until you find the right regimen for you.

    Topical Treatments

    Topical treatments—medications applied to the skin—are usually the first line of defense in treating psoriasis. Topicals slow down or normalize excessive cell reproduction and reduce psoriasis inflammation.

    There are several effective topical treatments for psoriasis. While many can be purchased over the counter (OTC), others are available by prescription only.

    Corticosteroids, or just "steroids," are the most frequently used treatment for psoriasis. They are referred to as anti-inflammatory agents, because they reduce the swelling and redness of lesions. Anthralin, synthetic vitamin D3, and vitamin A are also used in prescription topical treatments to control psoriasis lesions.

    OTC topicals come in many different forms. Two active ingredients, salicylic acid and coal tar, are approved by the FDA for the treatment of psoriasis. There are other products that contain substances such as aloe vera, jojoba, zinc pyrithione and capsaicin, which are used to moisturize, soothe, remove scale or relieve itching.

     Traditional Systemic Medications

    Systemic medications are prescription drugs that work throughout the body. They are usually used for individuals with moderate to severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Systemic medications are also used in those who are not responsive or are unable to take topical medications or UV light therapy.

    Systemic psoriasis drugs are taken by mouth in liquid or pill form or given by injection. Systemics have been used for more than 10 years.

    Phototherapy

    Phototherapy or light therapy, involves exposing the skin to ultraviolet light on a regular basis and under medical supervision. Treatments are done in a doctor's office or psoriasis clinic or at home with phototherapy unit. The key to success with light therapy is consistency.
    National Psoriasis Foundation does not support the use of indoor tanning beds as a substitute for phototherapy performed with a prescription and under a doctor's supervision. Indoor tanning raises the risk of melanoma by 59 percent, according to the American Academy of Dermatology and the World Health Organization, and does not provide the type of light that most effectively treats psoriasis.

    Ultraviolet light B (UVB)

    UVB phototherapy

    Present in natural sunlight, ultraviolet B (UVB) is an effective treatment for psoriasis. UVB penetrates the skin and slows the growth of affected skin cells. Treatment involves exposing the skin to an artificial UVB light source for a set length of time on a regular schedule. This treatment is administered in a medical setting or at home.

    There are two types of UVB treatment, broad band and narrow band. The major difference between them is that narrow band UVB light bulbs release a smaller range of ultraviolet light. Narrow-band UVB is similar to broad-band UVB in many ways. Several studies indicate that narrow-band UVB clears psoriasis faster and produces longer remissions than broad-band UVB. It also may be effective with fewer treatments per week than broad-band UVB.

    During UVB treatment, your psoriasis may worsen temporarily before improving. The skin may redden and itch from exposure to the UVB light. To avoid further irritation, the amount of UVB administered may need to be reduced. Occasionally, temporary flares occur with low-level doses of UVB. These reactions tend to resolve with continued treatment.

    UVB can be combined with other topical and/or systemic agents to enhance efficacy, but some of these may increase photosensitivity and burning, or shorten remission. Combining UVB with systemic therapies may increase efficacy dramatically and allow for lower doses of the systemic medication to be used.

    Home UVB phototherapy

    Treating psoriasis with a UVB light unit at home is an economical and convenient choice for many people. Like phototherapy in a clinic, it requires a consistent treatment schedule. Individuals are treated initially at a medical facility and then begin using a light unit at home.

    It is critical when doing phototherapy at home to follow a doctor's instructions and continue with regular check-ups. Home phototherapy is a medical treatment that requires monitoring by a health care professional.

    All phototherapy treatments, including purchase of equipment for home use, require a prescription. Some insurance companies will cover the cost of home UVB equipment. Vendors of home phototherapy equipment often will assist you in working with your insurance company to purchase a unit.

    Sunlight

    Although both UVB and ultraviolet light A (UVA) are found in sunlight, UVB works best for psoriasis. UVB from the sun works the same way as UVB in phototherapy treatments.

    Short, multiple exposures to sunlight are recommended. Start with five to 10 minutes of noontime sun daily. Gradually increase exposure time by 30 seconds if the skin tolerates it. To get the most from the sun, all affected areas should receive equal and adequate exposure. Remember to wear sunscreen on areas of your skin unaffected by psoriasis.

    Avoid overexposure and sunburn. It can take several weeks to see improvement. Have your doctor check you regularly for sun damage.

    Some topical medications can increase the risk of sunburn. These include tazarotene, coal tar, Elidel (pimecrolimus) and Protopic (tacrolimus). Individuals using these products should talk with a doctor before going in the sun.

    People who are using PUVA or other forms of light therapy should limit or avoid exposure to natural sunlight unless directed by a doctor.

    Psoralen + UVA (PUVA)

    Like UVB, ultraviolet light A (UVA) is present in sunlight. Unlike UVB, UVA is relatively ineffective unless used with a light-sensitizing medication psoralen, which is administered topically or orally. This process, called PUVA, slows down excessive skin cell growth and can clear psoriasis symptoms for varying periods of time. Stable plaque psoriasis, guttate psoriasis, and psoriasis of the palms and soles are most responsive to PUVA treatment.

    The most common short-term side effects of PUVA are nausea, itching and redness of the skin. Drinking milk or ginger ale, taking ginger supplements or eating while taking oral psoralen may prevent nausea. Antihistamines, baths with colloidal oatmeal products or application of topical products with capsaicin may help relieve itching. Swelling of the legs from standing during PUVA treatment may be relieved by wearing support hose.

    Laser Treatments

    Excimer laser

    The excimer laser—recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating chronic, localized psoriasis plaques—emits a high-intensity beam of ultraviolet light B (UVB).

    The excimer laser can target select areas of the skin affected by mild to moderate psoriasis, and research indicates it is a particularly effective treatment for scalp psoriasis {link to: /about-psoriasis/specific-locations/scalp}. Researchers at the University of Utah, for example, reported in The Journal of Drugs in Dermatology that in a small series of patients, laser treatment, combined with a topical steroid, cleared scalp psoriasis that resisted other treatment.

    Individual response to the treatment varies. It can take an average of four to 10 sessions to see results, depending on the particular case of psoriasis. It is recommended that patients receive two treatments per week, with a minimum of 48 hours between treatments.

    There is not yet enough long-term data to indicate how long the improvement will last following a course of laser therapy.

    Pulsed dye laser

    Like the excimer laser, the pulsed dye laser is approved for treating chronic, localized plaques. Using a dye and different wavelength of light than the excimer laser or other UVB-based treatments, pulsed dye lasers destroy the tiny blood vessels that contribute to the formation of psoriasis lesions.

    Treatment consists of 15- to 30-minute sessions every three weeks. For patients who respond, it normally takes about four to six sessions to clear the target lesion.

    The most common side effect is bruising after treatment, for up to 10 days. There is a small risk of scarring.

    Tanning beds

    Some people visit tanning salons as an alternative to natural sunlight. Tanning beds in commercial salons emit mostly UVA light, not UVB. The beneficial effect for psoriasis is attributed primarily to UVB light. National Psoriasis Foundation does not support the use of indoor tanning beds as a substitute for phototherapy performed with a prescription and under a doctor's supervision. Read more on the Psoriasis Foundation position on indoor tanning beds »

    The American Academy of Dermatology, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention all discourage the use of tanning beds and sun lamps. Indoor tanning raises the risk of melanoma by 59 percent, according to the American Academy of Dermatology and the World Health Organization. In May 2014, the FDA reclassified sunlamps (which are used in tanning beds and booths) from Class I (low risk) to Class II (moderate risk) products. The FDA can exert more regulatory control over Class II products, according to a press release on the FDA website.

    The ultraviolet radiation from these devices can damage the skin, cause premature aging and increase the risk of skin cancer

     Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Many patients today with chronic conditions, including psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, have an interest in complementary and alternative therapies—these focus more on preventative care and pain management.

    Surveys for the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) and National Center for Health Statistics (part of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention) show more than a third of Americans (36 percent) use complementary and alternative therapies. These therapies include diet, herbs and supplements, mind/body therapies such as aromatherapy, yoga and meditation, physical therapies, exercise and the ancient arts of acupuncture and tai chi.

    Much of the evidence supporting complementary and alternative therapies for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis is anecdotal. Increasingly, researchers have studied complementary and alternative therapies particularly in looking at drug interactions, dietary outcomes and safety. Most complementary and alternative therapies are safe. However, some can interfere with your treatments prescribed by your doctor.

    Always talk to your doctor or consult with a licensed health care professional before adding any complementary and alternative treatments to your treatment plan for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Need help sorting through alternative treatments? Naturopathic physicians use diet, exercise, lifestyle changes and natural therapies to promote wellness in their patients’ lives and help with disease management or minimize side effects from other therapies.

    Diet and Nutrition

    Many people with psoriasis have no doubt suspected what they eat affects their condition. Some find eliminating certain foods can help their psoriasis to clear. Learn more about certain foods that can help relieve symptoms

    Herbal Remedies

    Many herbal remedies have become mainstream in recent years. Don't mistake the terms "herbal" or "natural" or safe.

    Mind/Body Therapies

    Mind-body techniques can help reduce your stress levels.

    Alternative Therapies

    Some psoriasis patients report hands-on alternative therapies can help relieve their psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis symptoms.

    Exercise

    Physical activity is important for your overall health and especially so if you have psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. Exercise can help you maintain a healthy weight and lower your risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Your risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes is increased when you have psoriasis.

    Yoga and Tai Chi

    Yoga combines controlled breathing, stretching and strengthening exercises, and meditation to help control stress and improve blood flow to areas affected by psoriasis. Like yoga, Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese art that can be effective in treating arthritis.

     

    Resource http://www.psoriasis.org

    If you have any questions or concerns please call our clinic at (719) 438-2251.

KCHD

 

 

       

 

The Mission Statement of Kiowa County Hospital District is to create a healthy community through access to quality, friendly, state-of-the-art health care and health education.

 Kiowa County Hospital District is a State Licensed 25-bed Critical Access Hospital. We provide the following care and services:

  • Eads Medical Clinic
  • 24-hour Emergency Department
  • Ambulance Service offering ground and air services
  • Swingbed services for rehabilitation
  • Acute In-Patient services
  • Extended Care Unit (long term care)
  • On-site Lab
  • On-site Radiology
  • Out-Patient and In-Patient Physical Therapy

We also offer the following Specialty Clinics:

  • Dr. Barry Smith, Cardiologist scheduled monthly
  • Dr. George Gustafson, Cardiologist every 3rd Monday afternoon
  • Dr. Sean Oquist, Chiropractor scheduled every Wednesday
  • Dr. James Yakel, Podiatrist scheduled every other month
  • Sleep studies
  • Ultrasound services

 
 

If you have any questions or would like to make an appointment,
please call the Admissions Desk at (719) 438-5401
                                                              (719) 438-5697 fax

 

Kiowa County Hospital District Board Members

  • Sharon Frazee, Chairman
  • Robert Woods, Vice Chairman
  • John Negley, Secretary/Treasury
  • Roland Sorensen
  • Cathryn Anderson
  • Dennis Pearson
  • Lori Shalberg
  • Craig Kerfoot
  • Gary Aughenbaugh
  • Sylvia Shields

HIPAA

This notice describes how medical information about you may be used and disclosed and how you can get access to this information.

 Click here to review.