Diabetes Awareness Month

 

 

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month

 

Here are just a few of the recent statistics on diabetes:

  • Nearly 30 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes.
  • Another 86 million Americans have prediabetesa condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal but are not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. People with prediabetes are at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes and for heart disease and stroke. Other names for prediabetes are impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose, and are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, a condition characterized by high blood glucose levels caused by either a lack of insulin or the body's inability to use insulin efficiently.
  • Type 2 diabetes develops most often in middle-aged and older adults but can appear in young people.
  • The American Diabetes Association estimates that the total national cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States is $245 billion. –

Early detection and treatment of diabetes can decrease the risk of developing the complications of diabetes. The following symptoms of diabetes are typical. However, some people with type 2 diabetes have symptoms so mild that they go unnoticed. 

Common symptoms of diabetes:

  • Urinating often
  • Feeling very thirsty
  • Feeling very hungry - even though you are eating
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Blurry vision
  • Cuts/bruises that are slow to heal
  • Weight loss - even though you are eating more (type 1)
  • Tingling, pain, or numbness in the hands/feet (type 2)

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body's own immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (called beta cells).

Normally, the body's immune system fights off foreign invaders like viruses or bacteria. But for unknown reasons, in people with type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks various cells in the body. This results in a complete deficiency of the insulin hormone.

Some people develop a type of diabetes – called secondary diabetes -- which is similar to type 1 diabetes, but the beta cells are not destroyed by the immune system but by some other factor, such as cystic fibrosis or pancreatic surgery.

 

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, the bodies of people with type 2 diabetes make insulin. But either their pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body cannot use the insulin well enough. This is called insulin resistance. When there isn't enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose (sugar) can't get into the body's cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, the body's cells are not able to function properly.

Regular activity is a key part of managing diabetes along with proper meal planning, taking medications as prescribed, and stress management.

When you are active, your cells become more sensitive to insulin so it can work more efficiently. Your cells also remove glucose from the blood using a mechanism totally separate from insulin during exercise.

So, exercising consistently can lower blood glucose and improve your A1C. When you lower your A1C, you may be able to take fewer diabetes pills or less insulin.

Physical activity is also important for your overall well being, and can help with many other health conditions.

Regular physical activity:

  • lowers blood pressure and cholesterol
  • lowers your risk for heart disease and stroke
  • burns calories to help you lose or maintain weight
  • increases your energy for daily activities
  • helps you sleep better
  • relieves stress
  • strengthens your heart and improves your blood circulation
  • strengthens your muscles and bones
  • keeps your joints flexible
  • improves your balance to prevent falls
  • reduces symptoms of depression and improves quality of life

You’ll see these benefits even if you haven't been very active before.

If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms or have any questions, please call and make an appointment with one of our providers at our clinic.  (719) 438-2251

Reference http://www.diabetes.org/

KCHD

 

The Mission Statement of Kiowa County Hospital District is to create a healthy community through access to quality, friendly, state-of-the-art health care and health education.

 Kiowa County Hospital District is a State Licensed 25-bed Critical Access Hospital. We provide the following care and services:

  • Eads Medical Clinic
  • 24-hour Emergency Department
  • Ambulance Service offering ground and air services
  • Swingbed services for rehabilitation
  • Acute In-Patient services
  • Extended Care Unit (long term care)
  • On-site Lab
  • On-site Radiology
  • Out-Patient and In-Patient Physical Therapy

We also offer the following Specialty Clinics:

  • Dr. Barry Smith, Cardiologist scheduled monthly
  • Dr. George Gustafson, Cardiologist every 3rd Monday afternoon
  • Dr. Sean Oquist, Chiropractor scheduled every Wednesday
  • Dr. James Yakel, Podiatrist scheduled every other month
  • Sleep studies
  • Ultrasound services
 Please click the Calendar Tab to see when our Specialty Providers are scheduled to be here.  
 If you have any questions or would like to make an appointment,
please call the Admissions Desk at (719) 438-5401
                                                              (719) 438-5697 fax

 

HIPAA

Kiowa County Hospital District has updated our HIPAA Privacy Policy. Please click on the tab Privacy Policy on the bottom of this page to read the updated policy. This policy describes how medical information about you may be used and disclosed and how you can get access to this information.

9/1/2014